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Research Resources

This week I want to share a few resources that some readers may find helpful. I continue to believe that research will be increasingly important as schools move begin to adapt to the increased flexibility - and responsibility - afforded by ESSA. It's a big job for a company to keep up with what's happening in the education research world, but there are some resources that can help. Two of my favorites, because they are compact, easy to read and help keep me up to date on approaches to effectiveness research, are newsletters from Empirical Education and SEG Measurement. Read More »

SBIR Supports Ed Tech Developers

The Department of Education/Institute of Education Sciences' Small Business Innovation Research (ED/IES SBIR) program recently announced the award of 14 new contracts for FY 2016. The IES/SBIR program provides funding to small business firms and partners for the research and development of commercially viable education technology products designed to support student learning, teacher practice, or school administration in education or special education. The Department of Education's SBIR program has an annual budget of $7.5M.

There are some familiar names on this year's grantee list. Among the nine Phase I ($150,000, six-month contracts) grantees are EdSurge, Fablevision, Schell Games, and SpryFox. Teachley won a two-year $900,000 Phase II contract. Read More »

Speak UP! 2016

Project Tomorrow held its annual Congressional Briefing earlier this month and released "From Print to Pixel: The role of videos, games, animations and simulation within K-12 education," which documents the key national finding from the Speak Up 2015 survey. For 13 years now, Speak UP has examined how students are using and would like to see digital tools used for learning. Additional data is gathered from teachers, librarians, administrators, parents and community members which sometimes provides interesting contrasts, not just to student views, but also among the various groups of adult survey respondents. Read More »

Excellent STEM Teachers

During the celebration of Teacher Appreciation Week, President Obama announced progress towards his goal of preparing an additional 100,000 STEM teachers by 2021. The President issued the original challenge in his 2011 State of the Union address. To address that challenge 100Kin10 was formed, a network of 280 organizations, including school districts, universities, foundations, corporations, museums, nonprofits, and government agencies. To date, the network has trained more than 30,000 teachers. 100Kin10's partners have made commitments to recruit and train an additional 70,000 by 2021, meeting the President's goal. 100Kin10 reports that these projections have been verified by the American Institutes for Research, which has concluded the estimates are reasonable. Read More »

STEM for Early Learners

In a now familiar Obama administration pattern, a White House Early STEM Symposium brought together leaders from the public and private sectors who have committed to promoting active STEM learning for the country's youngest children. The Summit, presented in partnership with the Departments of Education and Health and Human Services and Invest in US, highlighted new steps being taken by the Obama Administration, including the development of new research grants, to improve early elementary science outcomes. Read More »

Assessing Soft Skills

It appears that the educational research community is concerned about growing interest on the part of schools in measuring soft skills like “grit” or a “growth mindset.” They’re not the only ones. It’s been disconcerting to watch school systems begin to consider adding measures of these soft skills to their accountability systems. At a time when everyone seems to agree that there is too much testing going, why would schools want to add still more assessments? As I read the research it’s not totally clear to me that we have solid evidence that some of the more recently embraced soft skills can be taught effectively. I know for sure we don’t have the instruments in place to measure them effectively. Read More »

Science Fair and STEM Literacy

The President hosted the 2016 Science Fair at the White House this Wednesday. This year marked the sixth and final year of the President hosting some of the nation's brightest and most inquisitive young minds. More than 130 students from more than 30 states, as well as student alumni from each of the prior five White House Science Fairs participated. Each of these students had been competitors and winners from a broad range of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) competitions across the country. Following the Science Fair, White House Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett moderated a panel discussion with students from each of the previous White House Science Fairs. The poise and intelligence of these young people is truly inspiring. Their advice: Start early and try science—you just might like it; don't stop with an idea, work on implementing it; and do what you love. Read More »

It's Testing Season

The nation's schools are in the midst of their 2015-16 assessment cycle, which began in March is some states and will extend through early June. On the whole, it seems a lot calmer than last year when a generalized feeling of anxiety about the consequences of the first required administration of Common Core summative assessments (then largely delivered by PARCC and SBAC) reached a fever pitch. That's not to say everyone is happy. Some parents continue to opt their children out of testing and several teachers' groups continue to lobby against "too much testing." Read More »

Horizon Report: 2016 Higher Education Edition

I don't write about higher education very much. It's not an area where I have a lot of experience and as a market, higher ed is very different from K-12. But as I read through the higher ed edition of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Report 2016, I was struck by the number of similarities. NMC identifies six barriers that are impeding technology adoption. As it does in its K-12 edition, NMC categorizes these barriers as solvable, difficult and wicked hard.
One of the solvable barriers is digital literacy. The report indicates that weak digital literacy skills are a problem that reaches well beyond higher ed. It's the familiar problem of students who may have grown up surrounded by technology, but are not necessarily very good at using it effectively. Students may excel when using digital products in familiar and predictable ways, but be unable to apply those skills to unfamiliar tasks or use them to solve more challenging problems than creating a play list or taking a selfie. The report's authors see this barrier as solvable since there are a lot of efforts going on to address the problem, many of which seem promising. Read More »

SEA Capacity, Infrastructure Spending

I've been trying to catch up on the news this past week or so and must admit a lot of stories have me thinking "What did you expect?" Education Week and other outlets have been reporting on State Education Agencies (SEAs). When Congress crafted the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), its intent was to return control over many education policies and decisions to the states and local districts. While the district and individual schools know best what students need, the resources available to meet those needs and the barriers that might exist to more innovative and flexible solutions, local control is not always the most efficient way to get things done. If districts act in isolation, there are a lot of people working to recreate the same wheel. SEAs play an important role in fostering collaboration, coordinating efforts and disseminating promising practices. But most SEAs are stretched just trying to maintain their current level of effort. They have limited capacity to take on new roles and responsibilities. Read More »