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ConnectHome

The President launched the next phase of his plan to expand access to high-speed Internet. Building on ConnectED, with its goal of connecting 99% of K-12 students to high-speed Internet in their classrooms over the next five years, ConnectHome aims to ensure that students also have high-speed access from their homes.

This is a relatively small effort. ConnectHome is focused on increasing Internet access for low-income families in 28 communities, including the Choctaw Nation. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), in collaboration with EveryoneOn and US Ignite, is working with private- and public-sector leaders to build local partnerships that will bring broadband, technical assistance, and digital literacy training to students living in public and assisted housing. Mayors in the identified communities have committed to reallocate local funds, leverage local programming, and use regulatory tools to support this initiative and the expansion of broadband access in low-income communities. Read More »

WA Opt-Out Statistics, Market Maps

On July 16, the Senate passed the Every Child Achieves Act, its bill reauthorizing ESEA, on an 81-17 vote. After more than a week of debate, the bill was not changed in any substantive way from its original format. None of the amendments focused on strengthening the bill's accountability features passed, though Democrats mustered 43 (including one Republican) votes for a fairly strong accountability measure. That's enough to block the passage of a conference bill that does not include more accountability measures. The bill now moves to conference to iron out the differences between the House and Senate version It will require careful negotiation to create a final bill that both chambers can pass. Read More »

ESEA Reauthorization, Common Core Test Results

Today's News Alert is very long, including as many of the news headlines that came out of last week's ISTE Conference as I could find. I've shortened headlines as much as possible to save space and for companies that made multiple announcements I only included the one I thought most news worthy in this e-mail edition. All the headlines can be found by browsing the various sections of the newsletter at ednetinsight.com or clicking through on the section you're interested in in this e-mail.

Having missed ISTE, I can only report on what crossed my desk (though a number of people I talked with reported high energy and big crowds, "more like the old days"). Platforms continue to proliferate. It's too early to tell how many platforms the schools will ultimately support, in part because the market continues to evolve. In the end, a platform vendor has to work hard at developing an complete ecosystem - the more you can access via the platform, the more people you have doing that and the more collaboration the platform supports -- , the more chance the platform has of becoming an "old standard" down the road. Read More »

Lifeline Expansion, FY16 Education Budget

Last week, the Federal Communications Commission voted along partisan lines to expand the Lifeline program by adding broadband internet service as a supported service. The Second Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Report seeked public comments on a variety of questions about how best to modernize the Lifeline program so that all consumers can access advanced networks while increasing the program's accountability and efficiency. The FCC's call for comments raises a number of questions about how best to modernize the Lifeline program, including issues around identifying low-income households that include school children and ensure they are aware of and have the opportunity to participate in a broadband access program, adopting minimum service standards for both voice and broadband service, reducing subsidy support for Lifeline supported mobile voice-only service, and encouraging more competition to improve price and service. Read More »

Millennials' Tech Skills

There's a story going around in the ed tech press about millennials having low technology skills. The first time I saw the headlines I thought - that's not really news. But after two or three more appearances in my news feed, I checked it out. Change the Equation (CTEq), a coalition of corporate and education organizations committed to improving STEM learning for every child, commissioned the American Institutes for Research (AIR) to analyze raw data from the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), a household study conducted by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development.

Remember that millennials are the first generation of people who grew up with computers and the internet, the so-called digital natives. Millennials spend on average 35 hours per week on digital media. But CTEq's analysis found that 58% have low skills in solving problems with technology. An international comparison of millennials' performance on PIAAC's technology test ranked the United States last out of 19 participating countries. Read More »

The Educator's Dilemma, Technology Counts

"The Educator's Dilemma: When and how schools should embrace poverty relief" from the Clayton Christensen Institute for Disruptive Innovation is sure to annoy a number of people. The paper takes on one of the long running debates between school reformers and poverty relief advocates over what it takes to close the achievement gap. Michael and his co-author Julia Freeland argue that this is a false dichotomy. Based on a theory of Christensen and his Harvard colleagues-the theory of interdependence and modularity-they argue that schools "must integrate backward beyond just core academic delivery to design and distribute a range of nonacademic supports." That will upset a lot of traditional school reformers, but the authors suggest two key conditions. It's not just a matter of giving low income students more services but of designing and delivering services in an interdependent manner that allows the school to control the mix and type of services offered to each student. And the driving force behind this backward integration has to be addressing the achievement gap. The paper profiles community schools, Harlem Children's Zone, KIPP and SEED Schools and how they have integrated backward into the nonacademic realms of low-income children's lives. It's an interesting theory. Read More »

Teachers on Data, Diplomas Count

The Gates Foundation has released the latest report in its Teachers Know Best series. "Making Data Work for Teachers and Students" is based on the responses of more than 4,600 teachers about the digital tools available to help them collect and use data to tailor and improve instruction for individual students. You can take the traditional route and download the entire report to see how teachers answered questions about their behaviors and beliefs, the specific occasions in which they use data to guide student learning and the challenges they face. Teachers also described and rated current tools and offered advice on ways to make digital tools more effective for teachers and students. Read More »

Personalized Learning

An interesting report was released last week. "Technology-Enabled Personalized Learning: Findings and Recommendations to Accelerate Implementation" summarizes the findings from last year's Technology-Enabled Personalized Learning (TEPL) Summit which was hosted by the Friday Institute for Educational Innovation at NC State University in collaboration with Digital Promise, the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA), and the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators (MAISA). Leaders from the education industry, associations and nonprofits, and university and K-12 education attended, working together to identified potential solutions and models that might help scale the implementation of personalized learning through technology. The report includes their recommendations. Read More »

FY 2016 Budget Progress and More Privacy Legislation

The federal FY 2016 budget process is now well under way. Last week Congress passed a joint budget resolution, the first such resolution in five years. It includes what is known as a 302(a) allocation that sets a total amount of money for the Appropriations Committees to spend, which is $1.017 trillion for FY 2016. Once the 302(a) allocation is set, the House and Senate Appropriations Committees set 302(b) allocations which divide the $1.017 total appropriation among 12 subcommittees, each of which deal with a different part of the budget. Those subcommittees then decide how to distribute funds within their 302(b) allocations. The Labor, Health and Human Services and Education allocation for FY 2016 is $153 billion, $3 billion lower than the FY 2015 total. As I've said earlier, under this scenario flat funding for the Department of Education would be good news. Certainly there's no room to accommodate the $3.5 billion increase included in the President's FY 2016 budget request. It's likely that a number of subcommittees will have difficulty crafting their appropriations bills in light of their tight budget allocations. The President has threatened to veto any spending bills that come in at sequestration levels, setting up the potential for a drawn-out battle between Congress and the administration down the road. Read More »

Speak Up Student Data

A few weeks ago, Julie Evans, CEO of Project Tomorrow, presented the Speak Up 2014 National Findings for Students at a Congressional briefing. Speak Up 2014 gathered responses from 431,231 K-12 students representing over 8,000 schools and 2,600 districts in the United States and around the world. Later releases will look at educator and parent data. The student data offers a glimpse of not only what students are doing with technology in their classrooms, but also what they think about those activities, what they would like to be doing, and how they use technology and digital resources outside of school. Read More »