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Sokikom's Massively Multiplayer Online Math Social Learning Game

Sokikom First Massively Multiplayer Online Math Social Learning Game Unveiled to Ed-Tech Community at ISTE 2011; Sokikom Already Earning High Praise for Building Skills and Love for Learning Math From Education, Technology and Parenting Communities

Philadelphia, PA (PRWEB) June 27, 2011 - Today at ISTE 2011, the first web-based massively multiplayer online math social learning game was unveiled to thousands of educators from around the country. Developed by Sokikom, this new online environment is designed to help students in grades 1-6 build skills while developing a love for learning math.

“Massively multiplayer online” means that an entire classroom of more than 30 kids can play the game together at any time, making Sokikom a great solution for math practice in and out of the classroom. Already implemented in schools around the country, Sokikom currently features three games: Frachine, which focuses on fractions, decimals and percents; Opirate, which emphasizes mathematic operations and algebra; and Treeching, which concentrates on the principles of measurement, algebra, patterns, time and money. A fourth game focusing on geometry will be released in late summer 2011.

Colorful, animated characters greet students when they log on to play a Sokikom game. After creating an avatar and taking a placement test, students are placed in a gaming level according to their abilities and quickly begin playing engaging games and solving real-life math problems.

Sokikom offers kids the ability to play individually or with a group. During individual game-play, kids go through a personalized math program that adapts to their abilities. If a student is stuck on a problem, the character, such as the friendly robot in Frachine, points them to a “help” button where the concept is reviewed. During team-based multiplayer games, students play together in real-time and help each other complete math tasks. As they master levels, challenges and multiplayer games, they earn Soki-Coins, which they can use to purchase items online to dress their avatar.

Initial Sokikom research studies, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, reveal the games lead to measurable progress in both test scores and student motivation to learn math. For example, a school in Tempe, Ariz., saw a 15 percent increase in math scores after just two-and-a-half hours of game play.

Company founder and CEO Snehal Patel had the inspiration for Sokikom when he was a math tutor. Patel said, “It was alarming how many students weren’t excited about and engaged in learning math. As a result, these kids were missing out on building the foundation in math skills that they were going to need to succeed in high school, college and beyond. I saw, however, that math games – especially those that were social – got these same kids excited about and engaged in learning math. This made me think: how many other students in the U.S. face this same problem, and how can we use online technology to address it? That was the genesis of Sokikom – a highly engaging online math game with community and team-play elements.”

He continued, “One question we get frequently is where the name ‘Sokikom’ comes from. It is a mix of some math geekiness and a portmanteau – a blend of the parts from two words – social and communal. Both of these words are joined by two k’s, which, when backed against one another, look similar to the mathematical symbol for a natural join. Sokikom means joining social and community to improve learning.”

Sokikom has already earned high praise from the education, technology, parenting and business communities. One school that has seamlessly integrated Sokikom’s games into its curriculum is Spectrum Elementary in Gilbert, Ariz. Principal Debbie Singleton is both amazed and delighted with the enthusiasm she observes when her students play Sokikom.

“It’s such a thrill for them every time,” said Singleton. “In the past, we’ve used math programs that were supposed to be games. Students enjoyed them for a while, but eventually, they would lose interest. It’s so different with Sokikom. They stay interested and motivated, and they believe in themselves. And that’s half the battle of finding success.”

Sokikom’s games have already earned a 2011 Best Education Software (BESSIE) Award, a 2011 Association of Educational Publishers’ Distinguished Achievement Award and were named one of Dr. Toy’s Best Children’s Vacation Products for 2011. The company was named the Best Educational Gaming and Adaptive Learning Company at the National Education Innovation Summit and one of 2011’s Most Innovative Internet/Social Networking companies in a competition by TiE50, which recognizes the world’s most enterprising technology startups.

A free, unlimited-use, basic version of Sokikom is available for schools and homes. Upgraded premium versions for educators and parents feature unlimited access to all the Sokikom games and additional exclusive content such as extra incentives and rewards for students. Annual classroom upgraded subscriptions are available at $19.95 per student. District volume discounts are available by contacting the company at info@sokikom.com or 480-788-1849.
Home upgraded subscriptions are available at $11.95 per month or $49.95 for six months.
For more information, visit http://www.sokikom.com, “like” the company on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/sokikom or follow on Twitter at http://twitter.com/sokikom.

Or learn more about how online games are helping children develop a love of math and build their math abilities on Sokikom’s blog at https://www.sokikom.com/blog/.

About Sokikom
Founded in 2008, Chandler, Ariz.-based Sokikom is an award-winning developer of math social learning games designed to motivate elementary school students in grades 1-6. Rooted in the nationally recognized standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Curriculum Focal Points for Grades PreK-8 and the new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics, Sokikom is focused on five core tenets: provide social learning where kids help kids learn math; adapt to individual students’ needs and learning styles; encourage positive and safe competitive game-play, which leads to measurable improvements; and connect school and home to allow for continuous web-based learning.